Tag Archives: mai black

Semla Recipe

  1. Stir 4oz lukewarm water, 1oz yeast and half a teaspoon of sugar in a bowl.
  2. Rest for a few minutes to allow the yeast to grow.
  3. Mix 4oz milk, 2.5 oz melted butter and a beaten egg. Pour into the bowl.
  4. Add 20oz bread flour, 2.5oz sugar, 1tsp salt and 1tsp cardamon.
  5. Bring together and knead for about 10 minutes.
  6. Cover it and let it rise until it’s doubled in size.
  7. After it’s risen, knock the air out of it and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  8. Form 14 balls and put onto a greased baking tray, one inch apart.
  9. Place the baking tray in a cold oven for about half an hour.
  10. Remove the buns from the oven and brush with beaten egg yolk.
  11. Cook the buns at 175ºC until golden brown (roughly twenty minutes).
  12. To make the marzipan filling, whip one egg white to soft peaks.
  13. Fold in 2.25oz ground almonds and 3.25oz icing sugar.
  14. Remove the buns from the oven and leave to cool.
  15. Slice into each bun and add a teaspoon of the almond paste.
  16. Add a dollop of whipped cream to each and sprinkle with icing sugar.
  17. Enjoy – but unless your name is Adolf Frederick, you might not want to eat them all at once.
Frederick I of Sweden - Wikipedia
Adolf Frederick of Sweden (1710-1771)

Inspiration for your own angry ghost poem

After reading some of the poems in my book, you might like to try writing one of your own. Here are some ideas to get you started.

Firstly, choose to write from the point of view of one of these people or, if you prefer, think of someone of your own.

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein, Portrait, Theoretician Physician

Angry that people blame scientists for the atomic bomb.

Emily Pankhurst

Angry that so many modern women choose not to vote.

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Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell. (1599-1658) on engraving from the 1800s. English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a stock photography

Angry that people celebrate Christmas.

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Next…

  1. Research your chosen person.
  2. Note down three or more facts about them.
  3. Imagine yourself as that person.
  4. Think about why they are angry.
  5. Think about who they might be angry at and direct your poem at them.
  6. Write in your characters’ voice.

Don’t feel you have to come up with something amazing on your first attempt. I spent months on some of my poems – and I’m still not happy with quite a few.

There’s always room for improvement but I still feel proud of what I’ve accomplished. I hope that you will too.

Good Luck

PS If you’re feeling stuck, here are some other characters you could write about

Robin Hood

Angry that most of Sherwood Forest has been cut down

Shaka Zulu

Angry that people don’t love their mothers enough

Jane Austen

Angry that she never got properly paid for her novels

Vincent Van Gogh

Angry that people only appreciated his art after he died

Lady Jane Grey

Angry that she was only queen for nine days

the language of poetry

Even though I’ve always enjoyed writing poetry, I’ve never felt very confident about using similes, metaphors and other poetic techniques. When using metaphors and similes in particular, I find it hard to avoid cliché and make them flow naturally with the rest of the poem.

Thankfully at the time of writing Thirty Angry Ghosts, I was reading and discussing at least one poem a week with other members of Suffolk Writers Group. These included some beautiful, inspirational work by Phyllis Wheatley, Elizabeth Barrrett Browning, Louis McNeice and William Wordsworth.

As is the case with someone who learns a foreign language, the more poetry I read, the more the language of poetry got into my blood. After a while, metaphors and similes began to seep out into my own writing fairly naturally. It is only now, looking back, that I can see how many different techniques I used.

Here are some examples

Some of these I used consciously and some just came out naturally. If you are using these resources for educational purposes, you might like to note down which techniques these quotations use and (if you have time) how they bring out the themes and meanings in the poems whilst (hopefully) adding to the reader’s enjoyment.

  • Simile
  • Metaphor
  • Personification
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Repetition
  • Rhyme
  • Rhythm
  • Alliteration
  • Consonance (like alliteration but the repeated consonants can appear anywhere in the word, not just at the start).

I have written a completed table below this one. Of course, your answers may differ from mine, especially the ‘Effect’ column. Poetry affects everyone differently after all.

Poem and QuotationPoetry TechniquesEffect
Neanderthal Woman   ‘the flame grew high, pierced the sky, licked its great orange tongue round the moon and spat.’  
Neanderthal Woman   ‘your nights will fill with memories of mechanical monstrosities’  
Neanderthal Woman   ‘She found rhythm in the rocks to match my chattering teeth.’  
Helen of Troy   ‘tangled his heart in the webbing of my silken locks.’      
Helen of Troy   ‘at the knife-edge of night and nightmares’    
Boudicca   ‘I was a drum thudding low and heavy beating out the sound for war.’    
Abu Bakr II ‘we reveled in the salty spray’    
Abu Bakr II   ‘wind lashed the waves’  
Abu Bakr II   ‘the emerald-tipped trees bowed down low’    
La Malinche   ‘For my words had wings and could fly to any man with ears to hear.’    
La Malinche   ‘the men who took me, chained me traded me for trinkets’  
La Malinche   ‘I was the face of the moon in a darkening sky. I was the bright, shining stream running over the rocks.’    
Henry VIII   ‘Fine jewels around the neck of an ugly girl shine like flies crawling upon excrement.’    
Henry VIII   ‘Taken by women stolen by women illegitimate women despised by God.’    
Margaret Catchpole   ‘Songs sung by Ancient Voices that surge silver rivers round the dry red rocks and soothe the scalded forest land.’    
Margaret Catchpole   ‘The Oak and Ash on pipes and fiddles Earl Soham Slog The Old Bass Bottle.’    
Ludwig van Beethoven   ‘Snip! – I heard it, quite clearly’    
Mary Shelley   ‘The earth trembles, turns and tumbles’    
Mary Shelley   ‘and a springtime of knucklebones surges up through the soil.’    
Mary Shelley   ‘And with their bones and blood and flesh the roots of the cypress tree shall be fed.’      

My Version – Don’t worry if yours is completely different. I just thought you might like to compare the two.

Like I said, I wasn’t totally conscious of all these things when I was writing. When I was editing, however, I worked hard to bring the techniques to the fore.

Poem and QuotationPoetic TechniquesEffect
Neanderthal Woman   ‘the flame grew high, pierced the sky, licked its great orange tongue round the moon and spat.’  PersonificationThis makes the flame seem like a conscious being which adds to the sense that it is wicked and dangerous after having taken on a life of its own.
Neanderthal Woman   ‘your nights will fill with memories of mechanical monstrosities’AlliterationI think the ‘m’ sound resembles someone calling for their mother but who is weakened or gagged. It is a mixture of a soothing sound and the sound of someone having restless sleep.
Neanderthal Woman   ‘She found rhythm in the rocks to match my chattering teeth.’Consonance and AlliterationThe ‘r’ and the ‘t’ sounds are intended to echo the sound of the rocks being rubbed against each other as well as hitting each other.
Helen of Troy   ‘tangled his heart in the webbing of my silken locks.’  MetaphorThis is a metaphor for love, taking the familiar, pleasant image of ‘silken locks’ and making her hair seem like a dangerous net or spider’s web.
Helen of Troy   ‘at the knife-edge of night and nightmares’    MetaphorThe use of the knife metaphor adds to the sense of danger and fear.
Boudicca   ‘I was a drum thudding low and heavy beating out the sound for war.’  Metaphor and ConsonantsThe repeated ‘d’ sound and the repeated ‘u’ sound (assonance) echoes the sound of a drum.   This metaphor shows that Boudicca feels powerful, strong and no longer human.    
Abu Bakr II   ‘we reveled in the salty spray’AlliterationThe repeated ‘s’ sound echoes the sound of the waves hitting the deck.
Abu Bakr II   ‘wind lashed the waves’Personification and alliterationThe repeated ‘w’ sound echoes the sound of the wind.
Abu Bakr II   ‘the emerald-tipped trees bowed down low’  PersonificationThe personification of the trees adds to the sense of Abu Bakr’s power in that even nature wants to praise him. This echoes the earlier phrase ‘the sun shone down a celebration’.  
La Malinche   ‘For my words had wings and could fly to any man with ears to hear.’  Metaphor    This emphasises how powerful her words were.
La Malinche   ‘the men who took me, chained me traded me for trinkets’AlliterationThe repeated ‘t’ sounds are reminiscent of someone tutting which emphasises how stupid she thinks the men were.
La Malinche   ‘I was the face of the moon in a darkening sky. I was the bright, shining stream running over the rocks.’  MetaphorThese images show how powerful she was but yet demonstrate how she was a symbol of hope, harmony and natural innocence as opposed to the violent cruelty of the men.
Henry VIII   ‘Fine jewels around the neck of an ugly girl shine like flies crawling upon excrement.’  SimileThis simile emphasises Henry’s distaste for women if they are unable to please him.
Henry VIII   ‘Taken by women stolen by women illegitimate women despised by God.’  Repetition and RhythmThe rhythm and repetition emphasise his outrage.
Margaret Catchpole   ‘Songs sung by Ancient Voices that surge silver rivers round the dry red rocks and soothe the scalded forest land.’  Alliteration, Rhythm and MetaphorThe repeated ‘s’ sounds are supposed to be reminiscent of the sounds of a river. The water metaphor demonstrates the power and soothing quality of the songs whilst the rhythm is meant to echo the music itself.
Margaret Catchpole   ‘The Oak and Ash on pipes and fiddles Earl Soham Slog The Old Bass Bottle.’  Rhyme, Rhythm, AlliterationThese are real, traditional Suffolk folk songs which I researched on the internet. I had a lot to choose from and I was pleased to find the half-rhyme with ‘fiddle’ and ‘bottle’ because, together with the alliteration and rhythm, it makes the stanza sound a bit like a song.
Ludwig van Beethoven   ‘Snip! – I heard it, quite clearly’  OnomatopoeiaThe word ‘snip’ imitates the sound of a pair of scissors.
Mary Shelley   ‘The earth trembles, turns and tumbles’  AlliterationThe repeated ‘t’ is supposed to echo the sound of the earth moving.
Mary Shelley   ‘and a springtime of knucklebones surges up through the soil.’  Metaphor and AlliterationAgain the repetition of ‘s’ is supposed to echo the sound of moving earth. The metaphor of comparing knucklebones to bulbs growing is meant to be nightmarish but yet hint at the environmental theme in that life can come from death and vice versa.
Mary Shelley   ‘And with their bones and blood and flesh the roots of the cypress tree shall be fed.’    Alliteration, Repetition and RhythmThe alliteration, rhythm and repetition of ‘and’ is supposed to be reminiscent of verses from the Old Testament which ties in with the overtones of Judgement Day. It is also supposed to sound a bit like a spell or an incantation. As such, I am trying to make the reader question whether Mary’s actions are just and fair or whether they are cruel and inspired by revenge.

Match the themes to the poems

Major Themes Explored

Revenge, Environmental Issues, Education, Human Potential, Reputation, Beauty, Story-Telling, Wealth, Sexism, Unfairness, Greed, Wisdom, Community, Justice, Love, Human Frailty, War, Mysticism, Archeology, War, Empire

Write the major theme or themes explored next to each poem.

Many of these are open to interpretation and there is always more than one answer.

Name of GhostThemes or Themes
  
Neanderthal Woman 
Tutankhamen 
Agamemnon 
Helen of Troy 
Homer 
Aeschylus 
Julius Caesar 
Cleopatra 
Boudicca 
Genghis Khan 
Abu Bakhr II 
Joan of Arc 
Wu Zetian 
Mansa Musa 
La Malinche 
Anne Boleyn 
Henry VIII 
William Shakespeare 
Pocahontas 
Adolf Frederick of Sweden 
Marie Antionette 
Margaret Catchpole 
Beethoven 
Mary Shelley 
Maria Quiteria 
Abraham Lincoln 
Queen Victoria 
The Unknown Soldier 
Grigori Rasputin 
Marie Curie 

Here are the major themes I had in mind when I was writing. It may be that you interpret them differently.

Name of GhostThemes
  
Neanderthal WomanEnvironmental Issues
TutankhamenArchaeology
AgamemnonUnfairness
Helen of TroyBeauty
HomerStory-Telling
AeschylusReputation
Julius CaesarReputation, Unfairness
CleopatraWisdom, Beauty
BoudiccaRevenge
Genghis KhanCommunity, Environmental Issues
Abu Bakhr IIReputation
Joan of ArcRevenge
Wu ZetianReputation
Mansa MusaWealth
La MalincheReputation
Anne BoleynSexism
Henry VIIISexism
William ShakespeareReputation
PocahontasRevenge
Adolf Frederick of SwedenGreed
Marie AntionetteJustice
Margaret CatchpoleLove
Ludwig van BeethovenUnfairness
Mary ShelleyEnvironmental Issues
Maria QuiteriaSexism
Abraham LincolnHuman Frailty
Queen VictoriaEmpire
The Unknown SoldierWar, Unfairness,
Grigori RasputinMysticism, Wisdom
Marie CurieHuman Potential, Education

Thirty Angry Ghosts

Suggested activities

My poetry collection should be out by late September 2021 when you will be able to buy a copy from this page.

If you would like to use the collection in an educational setting or a with a community group, here are thirty activity ideas which you might find useful.  These include arranging performances of the poems, using the book in drama lessons and a recipe for making the delicious semla buns!  

To get in touch, email me at suffolkwritersgroup@gmail.com.

Mai Black – poet and workshop leader

Please note: some poems in the book deal with serious issues and may not be suitable for children under the age of twelve.

  1. Email me to arrange a visit, zoom session or workshop.
  2. Email to ask me to judge an ‘Angry Ghost’ poetry writing competition.
  3. Hold a poetry reading event using these poems and/or some of your own.
  4. If you enjoy the poems, write a review on Amazon or Goodreads.
  5. Put on a show combining the biographies and the poems.
  6. Make costumes and/or masks for some of the ghosts.
  7. Paint portraits of the ghosts.
  8. Try sketching one of the ghosts using the front cover as a guide.
  9. Write your own angry ghost poem. (Click here for inspiration).
  10. Discuss which themes are explored in the poems. (Click here for activity.)
  11. Talk about which ghost is most justified in their anger.
  12. Write about your favourite poem. Explain why you chose it.
  13. List some of the metaphors used in the poems. (Click here for examples)
  14. List examples of similes from the poems. (Click here for examples)
  15. Discuss the use of other examples of figurative language in one or more poems. (Click here for my analysis.)
  16. Discuss how to give an effective reading of an Angry Ghost poem.
  17. Write about the ghost you most sympathise with.
  18. Discuss which ghosts make you feel angry, eg. Henry VIII or Queen Victoria.
  19. Write a letter to one of the ghosts.
  20. Think about who a poem is addressing and write a response from them.
  21. Read through the biographies and create a PowerPoint about one of the people. Alternatively, choose your own historical figure to research.
  22. Record yourself reading one of the poems.
  23. Make a bookmark by drawing an angry ghost and choosing a quote to accompany it.
  24. Follow the recipe and have a go at making some Semla buns. Click here for recipe.
  25. Write your own version of the one of the poems as a song, play or story.
  26. Act out an interview with one of the ghosts.
  27. Get one person to ‘freeze’ in the role of one of the angry ghosts. Other people take it in turns to stand behind them and whisper their thoughts.
  28. Read my analysis of Mary Shelley and then analyse one of your own poems in a similar way. (Click here for my analysis)
  29. Work as a group/class to make a collage or tapestry of the angry ghosts.
  30. Work as a group/class to produce your own poetry collection.

I’d love to hear about any activities you do based on the poems, so please email me with any photos, videos, sound recordings and pictures. If I have permission to share your work on social media, please let me know in your email.

To get in touch, email me at suffolkwritersgroup@gmail.com.

A very proud moment – here I am performing ‘Anne Boleyn’ at Primadonna Festival.
Running a zoom workshop with some of the wonderful members of Suffolk Writers Group.
An interactive writing workshop using pebbles and playing cards.